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The Michael Slate Show: Carl Dix on Portland, the heroic resistance to fascism, and the danger that the world and humanity face from the Trump/Pence Fascist Regime. Plus, American Crimes, the Trail of Tears, Segment 1

2 semanas 3 días ago
Carl Dix, talking about the Trump goon squads in Portland Oregon, and actually now in several other cities, about the heroic resistance, and the danger that the world and humanity face from the Trump/Pence Fascist Regime. American Crime, Case #44: The Trail of Tears, from a series of articles published at revcom.us/Revolution newspaper. This is taken from the video version of the article, which is found at TheRevComs channel on YouTube.
Michael Slate

TUC Radio: Paul Grignon: Money as Debt (ONE of TWO) Best of TUC, Segment 2

2 semanas 3 días ago
An independent movie on the question “Where does money come from?” became the most successful film on banking on the internet and was praised by notables like Catherine Austin Fitts, David Korten, Hazel Henderson, and Tom Greco. With over 2 million downloads between 2006 and 2009 and translated into 20 languages, the film has remained to this date one of the extraordinary teaching tools and inspiration for the monetary reform movement. This program is an update of TUC Radio’s 2009 Film on Radio version. Even though Grignon has since produced two sequels that deal with bailouts and stimulus packages, and how to create a nurturing economy, this first film remains a must see in the opinion of Korten, Greco, and that of many influential monetary reform organizations. Indeed the film has become more important today as the question of how to prevent another banking bailout remains unanswered.
 
 In part one of this double program Paul Grignon makes the case that only a very small part of our money supply is created by the government. The vast majority of money is created by banks whenever a loan or mortgage is made. Banks, which are private institutions, are given enormous power to make and manage money; and governments in most countries borrow the money for their operations from banks and have the taxpayers pay the interest. Among the unforgettable quotes included in the film is this one by Congressman Wright Patman “I have never yet had anyone who could, through the use of logic and reason, justify the Federal Government borrowing the use of its own money… I believe the time will come when people will demand that this be changed…(and) when they will actually blame you and me and everyone else connected with the Congress for sitting idly by and permitting such an idiotic system to continue.”  Patman was chair of the US House Committee on Banking and Currency from 1965 to 1975, the year before he died.
Maria Gilardin

TUC Radio: Paul Grignon: Money as Debt (ONE of TWO) Best of TUC, Segment 1

2 semanas 3 días ago
An independent movie on the question “Where does money come from?” became the most successful film on banking on the internet and was praised by notables like Catherine Austin Fitts, David Korten, Hazel Henderson, and Tom Greco. With over 2 million downloads between 2006 and 2009 and translated into 20 languages, the film has remained to this date one of the extraordinary teaching tools and inspiration for the monetary reform movement. This program is an update of TUC Radio’s 2009 Film on Radio version. Even though Grignon has since produced two sequels that deal with bailouts and stimulus packages, and how to create a nurturing economy, this first film remains a must see in the opinion of Korten, Greco, and that of many influential monetary reform organizations. Indeed the film has become more important today as the question of how to prevent another banking bailout remains unanswered.
 
 In part one of this double program Paul Grignon makes the case that only a very small part of our money supply is created by the government. The vast majority of money is created by banks whenever a loan or mortgage is made. Banks, which are private institutions, are given enormous power to make and manage money; and governments in most countries borrow the money for their operations from banks and have the taxpayers pay the interest. Among the unforgettable quotes included in the film is this one by Congressman Wright Patman “I have never yet had anyone who could, through the use of logic and reason, justify the Federal Government borrowing the use of its own money… I believe the time will come when people will demand that this be changed…(and) when they will actually blame you and me and everyone else connected with the Congress for sitting idly by and permitting such an idiotic system to continue.”  Patman was chair of the US House Committee on Banking and Currency from 1965 to 1975, the year before he died.
Maria Gilardin

Building Bridges: Representative John Lewis In His Own Words , Segment 1

2 semanas 3 días ago
Its Time, indeed its overtime to rename the Edmund Pettus Bridge, named after a former confederate brigadier general, and grand dragon of the Klu Klux Klan for Congressman John Lewis. Congressman John Lewis, who gave his hands for his entire life to dismantle the system of plantation-capitalism PRESENTE! A Building Bridges exclusive with, Congressman John Lewis in one of his last addresses to hundreds of public workers of Local 371 District Council 37 The bridge carrying the nefarious name of the grand dragon of the Klu Klux Klan, the Edmund Pettus Bridges was the site of the conflict of Bloody Sunday, March 7, 1965, when police attacked and brutally beat Civil Rights Movement demonstrators, among them Congressman John Lewis, who nearly lost his life there. As John Lewis gave his hands to struggle for the self-determination for people of African ancestry and to topple the system of white supremacy grew out of and was intended to preserve the system of plantation-capitalism he never faltered. But who can tell his story better then him? And, Building Bridges had the good fortune to attend and record one of Congressman Lewis last talks, before a standing room only crowd of public workers of Local 371, District Council 37 AFSCME. Lewis recalled his upbringing in the segregated South, including how he was denied a library card because the library was for whites only. He was determined to destroy segregation, joining with the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. as founder of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee to help plan the 1963 March on Washington. Two years later, Lewis helped lead the Bloody Sunday voting rights march intended to go from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama. White police, state troopers and thugs blocked their way on the bridge out of Selma, attacking the peaceful marchers with clubs, bullwhips and tear gas. Lewis suffered a cracked skull. Congressman Lewis went on to talk about his career in politics, representing Atlanta in for more than 30 years, and all the while imploring people to press for justice " to make what he came to call "good trouble, necessary trouble. But, as we said who can tell his story better than him so tune into this Building Bridges special edition and youll hear Congressman John Lewis as he imparted to every worker their a sense of their own worth and ready to give our hands to make good trouble, necessary trouble.
Ken Nash and Mimi Rosenberg

This Way Out: Gay Teen #BLM + Bye, Jeff + global LGBTQ news!, Segment 1

2 semanas 4 días ago
Black Lives Matter to young queer activists; saying “so long” to bigoted Jeff Sessions; the homeless young “Uganda 20” sue over jail abuse, Israeli lawmakers move to outlaw conversion therapy, Brazil’s “too macho for masks” president tests COVID-19 positive again, the U.S. sanctions Chechnya’s queer purge leader, U.S. states sue Trump to protect LGBTQ patients, Trump’s H.U.D. wants to train shelter workers in transgender bias, and more LGBTQ news from around the world!
Lucia Chappelle

Latin Waves : Interviews author/activist Yves Engler on Nafta , Segment 1

2 semanas 4 días ago
Yves Engler (born 1979) is a Montreal writer and political activist. In addition to seven published books, Engler’s writings have appeared in the alternative press and in mainstream publications such as The Globe and Mail, Toronto Star, Ottawa Citizen and Ecologist. His The Black Book of Canadian Foreign Policy book was on a short list for the Quebec Writers’ Federation Mavis Gallant Prize for Non-Fiction along with two other books. Host Sylvia Richardson speaks to Yves about Canadian foreign policy and the hypocrisy of our government putting sanctions on countries like Venezuela while excusing gross human rights violations in the coup governments of Honduras and Haiti, how Canadians should be paying attention to agreements like NAFTA and how those trade agreements are undemocratic and give corporations to much power over our lives, environment and working conditions. How as progressive we should use our independent judgement on agreements like NAFTA and not just support them because Trump doesn’t like them.
latinwaves@gmail.com

Indigenous in Music with Larry K: Thana Redhawks in our Spotlight Interview (Spoken word) Hour 1, Segment 1

2 semanas 5 días ago
Welcome to Indigenous in Music! This week Larry welcomes Taos, New Mexico Thana Redhawk. She is a published poet and award winning spoken word artist. Shell be stopping by to tell us all about her album Fires of Thunder. You can find out all about her and hear her music on her homepage at thanaredhawk.com. Music from Thana Redhawk, Gina Lorning, Q052, Angela Amarualik, Buggin Malone, Chris Ferree, Ed Koban, Mike Bern, Stolen Identity, The Isley Brothers, Santana, Stolen Identity, Shon Denay, Khu'eex, QVLN, Locos Por Juana, DJ Shub, Anachnid, Tchutchu, Esther Pennell, JC Campbell, Rosary Spence, Vilda, Mike Paul, Nadjiwan, Cary Morin, Twin Flames and much much more. Visit us on our music page at www.IndigenousinMusic.com and our homepage at www.indigenousinMusicandArts.org. We have underwriting and opportunities available. We are a non-profit, section 501(c) (3).
Anonymous