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TUC Radio: Rebecca Gordon on Nicaragua and Central America, Segment 2

2 jours 8 heures ago
Dr. Rebecca Gordon begins with a short history of the Nicaraguan revolution since 1978/79. She describes what the Sandinistas had done for the people of Nicaragua in terms of health, education, and dignity, but is quick to point that neither Pres. Danny Ortega or today’s Sandinista movement bears any political resemblance to the Sandinistas of the 80s who captured the world’s imagination and ire of the United States, which has a long and ugly history of intervening in Nicaragua. In particular via the Honduras based and trained Contra. She points out how Ortega and his wife Rosario Murillo had come back into power after making political alliances with the extreme right; and after joining a reactionary Catholic sect which led to the imposition of overly strict laws against abortion. Rebecca Gordon describes the background of the current street battles and repression in Managua and praises the protesters as another generation of Nicaraguans fighting injustice and for their liberty. She chides those former supporters of the Sandinista movement who are backing the Ortega government, claiming the US government is behind the rebellion, for not allowing the Nicaraguans to have their own agency, to act without being guided or manipulated by outside forces. Dr. Rebecca Gordon teaches in the Philosophy Department at the University of San Francisco and for the university’s Leo T. McCarthy Center for Public Service and the Common Good. Her publications include Letters from Nicaragua, Cruel and Usual: How Welfare “Reform” Punishes Poor People, and, in 2016, American Nuremberg: The Officials Who Should Stand Trial for Post 9/11 War Crimes, plus, she is a regular contributor to Tom’s Dispatch.
Maria Gilardin

TUC Radio: Rebecca Gordon on Nicaragua and Central America, Segment 1

2 jours 8 heures ago
Dr. Rebecca Gordon begins with a short history of the Nicaraguan revolution since 1978/79. She describes what the Sandinistas had done for the people of Nicaragua in terms of health, education, and dignity, but is quick to point that neither Pres. Danny Ortega or today’s Sandinista movement bears any political resemblance to the Sandinistas of the 80s who captured the world’s imagination and ire of the United States, which has a long and ugly history of intervening in Nicaragua. In particular via the Honduras based and trained Contra. She points out how Ortega and his wife Rosario Murillo had come back into power after making political alliances with the extreme right; and after joining a reactionary Catholic sect which led to the imposition of overly strict laws against abortion. Rebecca Gordon describes the background of the current street battles and repression in Managua and praises the protesters as another generation of Nicaraguans fighting injustice and for their liberty. She chides those former supporters of the Sandinista movement who are backing the Ortega government, claiming the US government is behind the rebellion, for not allowing the Nicaraguans to have their own agency, to act without being guided or manipulated by outside forces. Dr. Rebecca Gordon teaches in the Philosophy Department at the University of San Francisco and for the university’s Leo T. McCarthy Center for Public Service and the Common Good. Her publications include Letters from Nicaragua, Cruel and Usual: How Welfare “Reform” Punishes Poor People, and, in 2016, American Nuremberg: The Officials Who Should Stand Trial for Post 9/11 War Crimes, plus, she is a regular contributor to Tom’s Dispatch.
Maria Gilardin

This Week In Palestine: The Balfour Legacy Conference's Panel on Intersectionality, Segment 1

2 jours 12 heures ago
We continue our 5-show coverage of the Balfour Legacy Conference held in Cambridge, Massachusetts on November 11th, 2017, today featuring an extraordinary panel on intersectionality…the relationship of all human rights struggles with each other and the power of that recognition. The first to speak on the panel is Matowin Monroe, co leader of the American Indians of New England. She is also lead organizer for the Indigenous Peoples Day which works to get communities to recognize Indigenous People’s Day in lieu of Columbus Day, as was done by Cambridge in 2016. Matowin is followed by Gabriel Camacho whose parents emigrated from Mexico in the 1990’s. Gabe has served on the boards of a myriad of Latin organizations, and currently is the Immigration Programs Coordinator for the American Friends Service Committee. The next panelist to speak is Carl Williams, currently a staff attorney with the ACLU of Massachusetts, and former defense attorney for the Roxbury Defenders. He is active with the National Lawyers Guild, and is a Lecturer at the Northeastern Law School. The final speaker is Nadia Ben-Youssef, a lawyer and human rights activist and the first US representative for Adalah, the legal center for Arab minority rights located in Haifa, Israel. She is now developing Adalah’s US advocacy strategy to shape American discourse and influence US policy and practice in Palestine/Israel.
Truth & Justice Radio (WZBC)

This Way Out: Queer teen dating distress + global LGBTQ news + more!, Segment 1

3 jours 9 heures ago
Queer teens deal with dating dilemmas; a “Rainbow Minute” honors sadly closeted songwriter Lorenz Hart; Costa Rica’s top court orders slow-motion marriage equality, activists survive violent attacks in Armenia and Lithuania, a Russian teen is convicted of posting “gay propaganda”, St. Petersburg’s rainbow rally ends in arrests, belligerent Belfast Pride demands marriage equality, leading LGBTQ Danes snub the Trump appointed ambassador’s Pride reception, and more queer news from around the world!
Lucia Chappelle