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Radio Curious: Saul Diskin – Identical Twins, Segment 1

2 weeks 3 days ago
The End of the Twins, a Memoir of Losing a Brother Ever wondered what it would be like to have an identical twin—how alike would you be to that person? How much of an individual would you be? Saul Diskin and his identical twin brother Marty grew up together in New York City where Saul and Marty were inseparable. As adults, they began to live separate lives, Saul in Phoenix and Marty near Boston. In 1991, Marty, who had suffered from leukemia for 20 years, needed a bone marrow transplant, which he received from Saul. In his extraordinarily intimate book, “The End of the Twins, a Memoir of Losing a Brother,” Saul Diskin chronicles the rich relationship beginning with their early childhood and ending well past Marty’s death in 1997, shortly before their 63rd birthday. Saul Diskin recommends “Entwined Lives,” by Nancy Segal and “Cosmology and Creation: The Spiritual Significance of Contemporary Cosmology” by Paul Brockelman. Originally Broadcast: September 22, 2001
Radio Curious - Barry Vogel

The Alembic Files: Phantasms of Freedom, Part 3, Segment 1

2 weeks 3 days ago
In part 3, The Holy See is mentioned. More of “Hologram of Liberty.” Excerpts from “No Treason” by James Martin. Sandy Hook and reflexive legislation. If the Second Amendment is supposed to be a right, why isn’t it, really? The Gaspee Affair - an early false flag? What of the Butterfly Effect? One Charles A. Beard wrote a book that earned the enmity of elites in the early 20th Century. Why? How wealthy were the delegates to the Constitutional Convention? What about George Washington, how much was he worth? Just how ironclad is our Bill of Rights? A pertinent discussion of Sir Thomas More, The Devil and The Law. Conclusion and agreement to reconvene.
Anonymous

TUC Radio: Ignacio Chapela: The Story of Corn (TWO of TWO), Segment 1

2 weeks 3 days ago
The contamination of the cradle of corn with genetically engineered seeds - Ignacio Chapela from the University of California, Berkeley discovered that genetically modified corn had contaminated the cradle of corn in the remote mountains of Oaxaca, Mexico. The Zapotecan Indians have cultivated corn there for over 10,000 years. In Part TWO Chapela questions why a biotech company can take out a patent on a living seed after making minor changes in the DNA. He also warns of horizontal gene transfer whereby an engineered gene from one organism may enter the genome of another species, including humans. Ignacio Chapela is now (2018) associate professor of microbial ecology at UC, Berkeley.
Maria Gilardin

Taylor Report: Why the U.S. Threatens China, Segment 1

2 weeks 3 days ago
Sara Flounders joins the program to discuss her popular article, "Why the U.S. Threatens China." It has taken on greater relevance in the context of Canada's arrest of Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou. The 'trade war' isn't simply about trade: it's about the larger issue of the United States trying to contain China's overall economic rise. China wasn't supposed to succeed. It was supposed to be a giant sweatshop to sew t-shirts and assemble iPhones. Now, because of socialist planning, it is thwarting U.S. attempts at subjugation, and building a rapport with others who have been colonized and exploited. The U.S. is unable to compete economically with China in many sectors. Flounders describes how in its ongoing attempt to 'pivot to Asia,' America is leveraging its military advantage to put pressure on China.
Anonymous