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The Sonic Cafe: Sonic Cafe #120/Crime as a Career Choice, Segment 1

1 week ago
Sonic Café. Thin Lizzy. The Boys are Back in Town. Why?... cause they just got outta jail. That’s why. I’m Scott Clark and this is episode 120 of the Sonic Cafe. This time we explore crime as a career choice. It’s tougher than you may think to be a crook… so don’t give up your day gig quite yet. We’ll check in comedian Maria Bamford who shares how tough it is to psych your self up each day to be a street mugger. Then later comedian Jerrod Carmichael discusses the upfront expenses required to be a big time bank robber. We’ve wedged all this valuable insider advice in between a music mix including blues man Eric Sardinas, The Airborne Toxic Event, Tom Waits, Supertramp, the Arctic Monkeys and many more. And finally the Sonic Café presents an actual crime report. Listen for the Copper Clapper Capper featuring Jack Webb and Johnny Carson. So sit back and listen as we explore crime as a career choice… in another mix of intelligent, eclectic music, comedy and pop culture from that little café on the big blue pacific coast. We’re the Sonic Café.
Scott Clark

Classics and Beyond: Classics and Beyond 1901, Segment 1

1 week 1 day ago
Segment One Leonard Bernstein: Symphony No. 1 "Jeremiah" I. Prophecy: Largamente II. Profanation: Vivace Con Brio III. Lamentation: Lento Christa Ludwig: Soprano Israel Philharmonic Orchestra Leonard Bernstein: Conductor CD: Bernstein Conducts Bernstein: Symphonies Nos. 1 and 2 (Deutsche Grammophon) Segment Two Peter Eötvös: Mese: Rövidített Változat Peter Eötvös: Tape LP: Hungarian Electronic Music (Hungaroton) Segment Three Hank Roberts: It's a Free Country, Isn't it? Arcado String Trio: Hank Roberts: Cello, Mark Dresser: Bass, Mark Feldman: Violin Kolner Rundfunk Orchester David de Villiers: Conductor CD: For Three Strings and Orchestra (JMT)
Quality Radio Productions

The Alembic Files: National Security and Individual Freedom - Final, Segment 1

1 week 1 day ago
The last part of O’Brian’s speech cites the onset of certain troubling trends in law and government that threaten the values of Americans and the protections they supposedly have been guaranteed against governmental excess and potential tyranny. O’Brian warns of the growing disrespect for the presumption of innocence, citing that half of lawyers interviewed in the early 50s (during the Red Scare), believed that an individual’s invoking of the historical privilege against self-incrimination was a clear indication of guilt. He also noted that the right to differ, though readily accepted when involved in issues of little consequence, is heatedly contested when touching the heart of the existing order of beliefs. Inserted in the audio is an exchange from the film “A Man For All Seasons” in which Sir Thomas More and his son-in-law argue the latter’s willingness to lay every law low to indict a suspected law breaker: “And when the last law was down, and the Devil turned around on you, where would you hide, Roper, the laws all being flat? This country's planted thick with laws from coast to coast—man's laws, not God's—and if you cut them down, and you're just the man to do it, do you really think you could stand upright in the winds that would blow then? Yes, I'd give the Devil benefit of law, for my own safety's sake.” O’Brian’s speech, of course, ended on a note of optimism--his wishing not to believe or, perhaps, envision that, much like the Red Scare in the wake of which he spoke, 9-11 and the era of terrorism would allow government to coerce the population into giving up so much more freedom than was relinquished in the 50s for the promise of security. We live in an era in which governments are the chief purveyors of terrorism—a strategy meant to bring their citizens into an attitude of unquestioning obedience to make the path smooth for global totalitarianism. Forget your Democrat and Republican fealties. They’re nothing but a distraction to prevent us all from the realization that government—or the appearance thereof—has sold out the present and subsequent generations.
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