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THE THUNDERBOLT: TB 190308 End Games 2X, Segment 1

2 weeks ago
This week’s radio show is a replay of last week’s show because I f%#@ked up and sent the wrong show to KAOS, and especially since this show has a piece that directly addresses and issue at the Evergreen State College then I wanted to make sure my KAOS listeners hear this show. (I usually do a replay on the second week of the month anyway.) This show show reveals how rather than wallowing in darkness we could instead create an empire of light! We then contemplate the differences between ‘safe’ spaces and ‘public’ spaces and for the feature piece we describe the Machine’s seeming end game. The problem is that it is likely to end all of us. Lightning bolts of tongue-in-cheek love thundering down. Check it out.
Dancing Angel Media

Building Bridges: Gender/Race & Poverty in America , Segment 1

2 weeks ago
Gender/Race & Poverty in America: How the politics of welfare makes us sick and tired of being sick and tired! Whatever Fannie Lou Hamer was talking about soon became an impassioned plea for a change in the system that exploited the Deltas African-Americans. All my life Ive been sick and tired, she shakes her head. Now Im sick and tired of being sick and tired. Fannie Lou Hamer (1917 " 1977) who stood tall against the brutality, indignities, crushing poverty and intimidation of implacable racism Our Guest, Felicia Kornbluh, Assoc. Prof. of History and Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies at the University of Vermont. Her new book Ensuring Poverty: Welfare Reform in Feminist Perspective couples with her earlier work The Battle for Welfare Rights: Politics and Poverty in Modern America Felicia Kornbluh argues that the subject of welfare reform always has been single mothers, the animus always has been race, and the currency always has been inequality. Yet public conversations about poverty and welfare, even today, rarely acknowledge the nexus between racialized gender inequality and the economic vulnerability of single-mother families. In Ensuring Poverty, Felicia Kornbluh and Gwendolyn Mink assess the gendered history of welfare reform and advance the ideas for a welfare policy that would respect single mothers' rights while advancing their opportunities and assuring economic security for their families. Kornbluh and Mink consider welfare policy in the broad intersectional context of gender, race, poverty, and inequality. Since passage of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act by the Clinton administration, the gendered dimensions of antipoverty policy have receded from debate. Mink and Kornbluh explore the narrowing of discussion that has occurred in recent decades and the path charted by social justice feminists in the 1990s and early 2000s, a course rejected by policy makers. They advocate a return to the social justice approach built on the equality of mothers, especially mothers of color, in policies aimed at poor families.
Ken Nash and Mimi Rosenberg

Building Bridges: Gender/Race & Poverty in America , Segment 1

2 weeks ago
Gender/Race & Poverty in America: How the politics of welfare makes us sick and tired of being sick and tired! Whatever Fannie Lou Hamer was talking about soon became an impassioned plea for a change in the system that exploited the Deltas African-Americans. All my life Ive been sick and tired, she shakes her head. Now Im sick and tired of being sick and tired. Fannie Lou Hamer (1917 " 1977) who stood tall against the brutality, indignities, crushing poverty and intimidation of implacable racism Our Guest, Felicia Kornbluh, Assoc. Prof. of History and Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies at the University of Vermont. Her new book Ensuring Poverty: Welfare Reform in Feminist Perspective couples with her earlier work The Battle for Welfare Rights: Politics and Poverty in Modern America Felicia Kornbluh argues that the subject of welfare reform always has been single mothers, the animus always has been race, and the currency always has been inequality. Yet public conversations about poverty and welfare, even today, rarely acknowledge the nexus between racialized gender inequality and the economic vulnerability of single-mother families. In Ensuring Poverty, Felicia Kornbluh and Gwendolyn Mink assess the gendered history of welfare reform and advance the ideas for a welfare policy that would respect single mothers' rights while advancing their opportunities and assuring economic security for their families. Kornbluh and Mink consider welfare policy in the broad intersectional context of gender, race, poverty, and inequality. Since passage of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act by the Clinton administration, the gendered dimensions of antipoverty policy have receded from debate. Mink and Kornbluh explore the narrowing of discussion that has occurred in recent decades and the path charted by social justice feminists in the 1990s and early 2000s, a course rejected by policy makers. They advocate a return to the social justice approach built on the equality of mothers, especially mothers of color, in policies aimed at poor families.
Ken Nash and Mimi Rosenberg

Other Voices, Other Choices: Tim DeChristopher at Burning Books, Segment 2

2 weeks ago
Tim DeChristopher is a climate activist who served 21 months in prison for disrupting a 2008 federal oil and gas lease auction of 116 parcels of public land in Utah's Red Rock County. For more information visit timdechristopher.org Burning Books is a radical bookstore in Buffalo, NY, specializing in activism, social justice, and liberation struggles. For more information visit burningbooks.com
Other Voices, Other Choices

Other Voices, Other Choices: Tim DeChristopher at Burning Books, Segment 1

2 weeks ago
Tim DeChristopher is a climate activist who served 21 months in prison for disrupting a 2008 federal oil and gas lease auction of 116 parcels of public land in Utah's Red Rock County. For more information visit timdechristopher.org Burning Books is a radical bookstore in Buffalo, NY, specializing in activism, social justice, and liberation struggles. For more information visit burningbooks.com
Other Voices, Other Choices

The Sonic Cafe: Sonic Cafe #128/Solid Gold 70's, Segment 1

2 weeks ago
Sonic Café, Reelin’ in the Years, that’s the music of Steely Dan from there 1972 Can’t Buy a Thrill album release. I’m Scott Clark, that guy over there, in the booth, in the back, in the dark… yeah that’s me, welcome to episode 128. This time the Sonic Café rewinds the clock to the days of top 40 radio with a fun mix of solid gold hits from the 1970’s. Listen for Rod Stewart, Billy Preston, The O’Jays, Stealers Wheel, Elton John, the Doobie Brothers and of course more. You’ll also hear King Tut, captured from Steve Martin’s 1978 debut performance on Saturday Night Live. And finally, a big Sonic Café welcome to a new sponsor, who’s actually an old sponsor. Listen for a word from the Super Bass-o-matic 76. Man, that’s great bass! All that and of course more as we spin Solid Gold hits of the 1970’s this time from that little café on the coast, where we’ve just finished installing all new wall to wall shag carpeting. We’re the Sonic Café.
Scott Clark