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The Alembic Files: Your Life is Their Toy - Part 3, Segment 1

2 months ago
Health and life are man's most precious possessions; and anxiety to preserve them is natural. It is not surprising, therefore, that they have been exploited since time immemorial. Every age has had its charlatans, quacks and medicine men. Much in the same measure as social organization has attained its highest pitch in the present era, the exploitation of health and life today has reached its zenith. Never before in history has there arisen such an extensive conspiracy about the problem of public health of entire nations, involving well-organized, opposing political and commercial groups. The consequence of this welter of exploitation is the sacrifice of human comfort, happiness, health and life. --Emanuel Josephson, 1941, "Your Life is Their Toy."
A. L. Aric

Back in the USSR: Ferguson and Black Liberation, Segment 2

2 months ago
Back in the USSR addresses the 2014 uprising in Ferguson, Missouri and the mass struggle against racism, police brutality and murder of black people that was galvanized by that uprising across North America. Imperialism, brothers and sisters, is not simply about aerial bombing campaigns and military invasions of other countries; it is all around us in our daily lives in everyday social, political and economic interactions. The Ferguson uprising and the American state's response to it confirms this reality with brutal clarity.
Back in the USSR

Back in the USSR: Ferguson and Black Liberation, Segment 1

2 months ago
Back in the USSR addresses the 2014 uprising in Ferguson, Missouri and the mass struggle against racism, police brutality and murder of black people that was galvanized by that uprising across North America. Imperialism, brothers and sisters, is not simply about aerial bombing campaigns and military invasions of other countries; it is all around us in our daily lives in everyday social, political and economic interactions. The Ferguson uprising and the American state's response to it confirms this reality with brutal clarity.
Back in the USSR

TUC Radio: How is Climate Change Affecting the Recent Heat Waves, Segment 2

2 months ago
At the end of July 2018 Climate Signals.org brought together three eminent climate scientists via Skype to exchange ideas on the impacts of global warming as they are now "playing out in real-time". Mike Mann is director of the Earth System Science Center at Pennsylvania State University, Jennifer Francis is research professor at Rutgers University's Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences, and Noah Diffenbaugh is the Kara J Foundation Professor and Kimmelman Family Senior Fellow at Stanford University. They discuss the recent heat waves around the globe, and how they connect with the changing jet stream pattern. Prof. Michael Mann is lead author of a paper produced in 1999 Mann used advanced statistical techniques to find regional variations in a hemispherical climate reconstruction to produce a reconstruction of climate over the past 1,000 years which was dubbed the "hockey stick graph" because of its shape. He is the author of more than 200 peer-reviewed and edited publications, numerous op-eds and commentaries, and four books including: Dire Predictions: Understanding Climate Change and The Madhouse Effect: How Climate Change Denial is Threatening our Planet, Destroying Our Politics, and Driving Us Crazy. Prof. Jennifer Francis' research interests are the connections between rapid Arctic warming and weather patterns in mid-latitudes, particularly extreme weather events, causes and impacts of Arctic sea-ice loss and the linkages to accelerated melt of the Greenland ice sheet. Prof. Noah Diffenbaugh is Kara J Foundation Professor at Stanford University. He studies and writes about the climate system, including the processes by which climate change could impact agriculture, water resources, and human health. Dr. Diffenbaugh is currently Editor-in-Chief of the peer-review journal Geophysical Research Letters.
Maria Gilardin

TUC Radio: How is Climate Change Affecting the Recent Heat Waves, Segment 1

2 months ago
At the end of July 2018 Climate Signals.org brought together three eminent climate scientists via Skype to exchange ideas on the impacts of global warming as they are now "playing out in real-time". Mike Mann is director of the Earth System Science Center at Pennsylvania State University, Jennifer Francis is research professor at Rutgers University's Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences, and Noah Diffenbaugh is the Kara J Foundation Professor and Kimmelman Family Senior Fellow at Stanford University. They discuss the recent heat waves around the globe, and how they connect with the changing jet stream pattern. Prof. Michael Mann is lead author of a paper produced in 1999 Mann used advanced statistical techniques to find regional variations in a hemispherical climate reconstruction to produce a reconstruction of climate over the past 1,000 years which was dubbed the "hockey stick graph" because of its shape. He is the author of more than 200 peer-reviewed and edited publications, numerous op-eds and commentaries, and four books including: Dire Predictions: Understanding Climate Change and The Madhouse Effect: How Climate Change Denial is Threatening our Planet, Destroying Our Politics, and Driving Us Crazy. Prof. Jennifer Francis' research interests are the connections between rapid Arctic warming and weather patterns in mid-latitudes, particularly extreme weather events, causes and impacts of Arctic sea-ice loss and the linkages to accelerated melt of the Greenland ice sheet. Prof. Noah Diffenbaugh is Kara J Foundation Professor at Stanford University. He studies and writes about the climate system, including the processes by which climate change could impact agriculture, water resources, and human health. Dr. Diffenbaugh is currently Editor-in-Chief of the peer-review journal Geophysical Research Letters.
Maria Gilardin

Sea Change Radio: Ian Power: Rocking Climate Change, Segment 1

2 months ago
There is no silver bullet to solve the intractable problem of global warming. Nevertheless, there is a lot of vital and hopeful work being done to chip away at the mountain of problems human beings have wreaked on this planet. This week on Sea Change Radio, we look at two innovative ideas that are moving us in a hopeful direction. First, we speak to Ian Power, an assistant professor at Trent University in Ontario, Canada, who is working on a breakthrough in manufacturing a CO2-absorbing mineral called magnesite in a fraction of the time that it forms in nature. We discuss his team’s research, learn about the methods they used, and talk about this unusual mineral’s potential to fight climate change. Then, we revisit a 2017 interview with the CEO of Zero Mass Water, Cody Friesen, to learn about his company’s promising technology that uses special solar panels to transform humidity in the air into clean drinking water.
Sea Change Radio