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The Michael Slate Show: David Palumbo-Liu, Trump's Nationalist Declaration; Bob Avakian, Spreading the Fighting Spirit Confronting Fascists; Sunsara Taylor, The Elections , Segment 1

3 months ago
David Palumbo-Liu on Trump’s Embrace of “Nationalist” Label Is Final Link to Dangerous Pattern. Bob Avakian on “How to spread the fighting spirit confronting fascists despite what Dems say?” Sunsara Taylor speaking in New York at a protest called by Refuse Fascism for November 7, the day after the elections.
Michael Slate

TUC Radio: Restoring the Forest - the Indian Way, Dennis Martinez, Segment 2

3 months ago
Maria's introduction: Even though the so far most deadly fire of Northern California is over 100 miles away it fills the air with an acrid smoke that has obscured the sun for days now. The town of Paradise went up in flames. It’s a little over 20 years ago that I recorded the documentary that you will hear again. My visit to Mountain Grove, Oregon, opened up a part of Native American history and culture and forest practice. That gave me hope that maybe we could undo and heal the damage that Western European settlement and industrial forest practice had done to the peoples and the lands of what is now California. In Washington, DC, Trump is sending out tweets that the fires are due to poor forest management and he threatens to cut federal aid, implying that all would be OK if there was more logging and mining and drilling going on. Trump has that power and may yet exercise it since nearly 60 percent of California forests are under federal management, and another two-thirds under private control. When Spanish Conquistadors rode up the West Coast they were astonished to see that they entered forests that looked like parks with widely spaced trees. Church and military records show that in the early 19th century California’s forests were carefully tended. The catastrophic wildfires of today were extremely rare. California Natives used controlled fires to create these parks but the use of fire was outlawed by the Settlers from 1850 on. There is now talk about bringing back controlled burns - but how complex, interwoven with intimate knowledge of the web of life that practice is, was beginning to dawn on me when I set out to Mountain Grove for a three day visit with Dennis Martinez. Dennis Martinez is of O'odham/Chicano heritage, and helps traditional communities with the restoration of ancestral lands. He is well loved writer and lecturer. He is a seed collector, vegetation surveyor, restoration tree thinner and ethno-botanist.
Maria Gilardin

TUC Radio: Restoring the Forest - the Indian Way, Dennis Martinez, Segment 1

3 months ago
Maria's introduction: Even though the so far most deadly fire of Northern California is over 100 miles away it fills the air with an acrid smoke that has obscured the sun for days now. The town of Paradise went up in flames. It’s a little over 20 years ago that I recorded the documentary that you will hear again. My visit to Mountain Grove, Oregon, opened up a part of Native American history and culture and forest practice. That gave me hope that maybe we could undo and heal the damage that Western European settlement and industrial forest practice had done to the peoples and the lands of what is now California. In Washington, DC, Trump is sending out tweets that the fires are due to poor forest management and he threatens to cut federal aid, implying that all would be OK if there was more logging and mining and drilling going on. Trump has that power and may yet exercise it since nearly 60 percent of California forests are under federal management, and another two-thirds under private control. When Spanish Conquistadors rode up the West Coast they were astonished to see that they entered forests that looked like parks with widely spaced trees. Church and military records show that in the early 19th century California’s forests were carefully tended. The catastrophic wildfires of today were extremely rare. California Natives used controlled fires to create these parks but the use of fire was outlawed by the Settlers from 1850 on. There is now talk about bringing back controlled burns - but how complex, interwoven with intimate knowledge of the web of life that practice is, was beginning to dawn on me when I set out to Mountain Grove for a three day visit with Dennis Martinez. Dennis Martinez is of O'odham/Chicano heritage, and helps traditional communities with the restoration of ancestral lands. He is well loved writer and lecturer. He is a seed collector, vegetation surveyor, restoration tree thinner and ethno-botanist.
Maria Gilardin

Dr. Anthony DiMaggio: The 2018 Election and Populism in the Era of Trump, Segment 1

3 months ago
Dr. Anthony DiMaggio researches populism in the era of Trump. His research includes both left and right wing components. The popular narrative in the U.S. media is that rising economic insecurity and anxiety is linked to the embrace of right-wing politics and to Trump voting. DiMaggio takes apart this myth, explaining what factors are really driving the rise of left and right-wing protest in America. His discussion covers popular protests, including the Tea Party, the Madison protests, Occupy Wall Street, the Fight for $15, Trump and Sanders populism, the anti-Trump protests, and #MeToo. He discusses the just concluded outcome of the 2018 midterm election with an eye toward examining how citizen discontent and populism impacted voting in the House and Senate.
Dale Lehman/WZRD

The Alembic Files: National Security and Individual Freedom - Part 2, Segment 1

3 months ago
This is a series based on a speech given at Harvard across April 27 and 28, 1955, by John Lord O’Brian, whose government service on behalf of the people is impressive, and one need only search his name to get a sense about the issues he felt most deeply. But no issue could have moved him more than the one to which he spoke at Harvard as part of the institution’s venerated Godkin Lectures on the Essentials of Free Government and the Duties Of the Citizen. Although it would have saddened him to find that his worst fears had been realized, O’Brian warned of the government’s use of terror or the threat of terror to induce its citizenry to relinquish its liberties for the specious promise of security. And here we are.
A. L. Aric

Sea Change Radio: John Stoehr: A Lovely Day for Democrats, Segment 1

3 months ago
Did you know that in last week's election, only half of eligible voters turned out? And that turnout was surprisingly robust as election prognosticators expected it to be more in the 35 to 40 percent range. Well, smart political strategists are trying to change the political landscape by engaging the significant piece of the pie that is eligible non-voters. This week on Sea Change Radio, we speak to John Stoehr, an opinion columnist at the New Haven Register and publisher of The Editorial Board, to get his thoughts on the recent midterm elections. We try to make sense of the results of last Tuesday's election, examine voter suppression tactics in places like Georgia and Florida, and talk about the impact of door-to-door canvassing.
Sea Change Radio

Radio Curious: Fuller, Alexandra — Growing Up White in Africa, Segment 1

3 months ago
In the late summer of 2003 Radio Curious visited with Alexandra Fuller who, as a child lived in Rhodesia, Malawi and Zambia in southeast Africa between 1972 and 1990.  After her father sided with the white government in the Rhodesian civil war, he was often away from home.   Fuller’s resilient and self-sufficient mother immersed herself in their rural and rugged life. She taught her children to have strong wills and opinions, and to whole-heartedly embrace life, despite and because of their difficult circumstances.  Alexandra Fuller, author of “Don’t Let’s Go To The Dogs Tonight: An African Childhood,” known as Bobo to her family, developed a love of reading and story telling early on in her life.   When I spoke with Alexandra Fuller in September 2003 her home was in rural Wyoming.  We visited by phone and began our conversation when I asked her how she choose the title for her book, “Don’t Let’s Go To The Dogs Tonight: An African Childhood.” The book Alexandra Fuller recommends is “Echoing Silences,” by Alexander Canigone.  
Radio Curious - Barry Vogel

The Mind's Ear: Regret This Very Day, Vol. IV, Segment 1

3 months ago
On November 18th, 1978, 918 people perished in Guyana in what has come to be known as the Jonestown Tragedy. The vast majority of those who perished were American citizens, and the Jonestown Tragedy remained the greatest loss of American life in a single deliberate act until the terrorist attacks that occurred on September 11th, 2001. “Regret this very Day” is a multi-part, nonlinear experimental radio documentary about the Peoples Temple and its charismatic founder Jim Jones produced by Ernestus Jiminy Chald. Unlike more traditional documentaries, “Regret this very Day” has no narrator or explanatory notes to fill the listener in on the particularities of what occurred within the Peoples Temple. Instead, Ernestus Jiminy Chald laboriously examined hundreds of hours of recorded tapes left behind by the Peoples Temple and selected material directly from these tapes to give the listener an insider glimpse into the world that Jim Jones and his followers inhabited. People often wonder how this sort of event could have happened. Why would nearly 1,000 people become so devoted to a single man and his revolutionary cause that they would literally give up their lives for him when ordered to do so? To many, such a notion seems absurd and unfathomable. But when one listens to these tapes, and considers the circumstances surrounding what happened in Jonestown on that fateful day and the events that led up to it, a portrait begins to emerge of a community that simply wanted to create a better world for their children than the racist, hateful world that American society offered them, and of the captivating leader who promised to create that world for them.
The Mind's Ear

The Mind's Ear: "Regret This Very Day, Vol. III", Segment 1

3 months ago
On November 18th, 1978, 918 people perished in Guyana in what has come to be known as the Jonestown Tragedy. The vast majority of those who perished were American citizens, and the Jonestown Tragedy remained the greatest loss of American life in a single deliberate act until the terrorist attacks that occurred on September 11th, 2001. “Regret this very Day” is a multi-part, nonlinear experimental radio documentary about the Peoples Temple and its charismatic founder Jim Jones produced by Ernestus Jiminy Chald. Unlike more traditional documentaries, “Regret this very Day” has no narrator or explanatory notes to fill the listener in on the particularities of what occurred within the Peoples Temple. Instead, Ernestus Jiminy Chald laboriously examined hundreds of hours of recorded tapes left behind by the Peoples Temple and selected material directly from these tapes to give the listener an insider glimpse into the world that Jim Jones and his followers inhabited. People often wonder how this sort of event could have happened. Why would nearly 1,000 people become so devoted to a single man and his revolutionary cause that they would literally give up their lives for him when ordered to do so? To many, such a notion seems absurd and unfathomable. But when one listens to these tapes, and considers the circumstances surrounding what happened in Jonestown on that fateful day and the events that led up to it, a portrait begins to emerge of a community that simply wanted to create a better world for their children than the racist, hateful world that American society offered them, and of the captivating leader who promised to create that world for them.
The Mind's Ear

PGP: Lincoln - Parts 5 & 6, Segment 1

3 months ago
Who killed Abraham Lincoln?.. We all know the official story, but much can be potentially lost and buried amid 150 years of propaganda, distraction and endless war. Feel free to join us on a practical and entertaining journey through the topic by way of a casual reading of Why Everything You Think You Know About the Lincoln Assassination is Wrong (Anatomy of a Presidential Assassination), as compiled by late author and researcher, David McGowan and the Center for an Informed America.
Pure Grace

Jazz Progressions: Jazz Progressions 1812, Segment 1

3 months ago
Segment One An Eye Over Autumy by Steve Khan CD: The Blue Man (Columbia) Captain Fingers by Lee Ritenour CD: Captain Fingers (Epic) Segment Two Boogie Woogie Waltz by The Nels Cline Singers CD: Initiate (Cryptogramophone) Heavy Feel by Larry Coryell CD: Heavy Feel (Wide Hive) Segment Three Mira's Do-Re-Mis by Zvonimir Tot CD: Eloquent Silence (Chicago Sessions) Fade to Black by The Alex Skolnick Trio CD: Veritas (Palmetto) Discovery by John McLaughlin and the 4th Dimension CD: To the One (Abstract Logix)
Quality Radio Productions

This Way Out: A Rainbow Wave washes over U.S. midterms + more global LGBTQ news!, Segment 1

3 months ago
A rainbow-hued “Blue Wave” brightens the U.S. midterm elections; Scotland puts queer culture in the books, election anxiety kills an LGBTQ Christian forum in Armenia, Indonesia’s latest round-up nets lesbians for “rehab”, Tanzanian terror continues - fed claims to the contrary - while loud voices bite the eraser off Trump’s trans-exclusion plans, retired out Aussie High Court Judge Michael Kirby concedes to a 50th anniversary wedding, and more global LGBTQ news!
Lucia Chappelle